Yves Boudreau speaks with Mark Thiele of IDCA on Edge Technology

Yves Boudreau speaks with Mark Thiele of IDCA on Edge Technology

Yves Boudreau,VP of Partnerships and Ecosystem Strategy at EDGE GRAVITY recorded a new podcast with IDCA Technical Standards Committee member Mark Thiele on edge technology and its impact on not only the IT industry but also how technology will push even more change in our world.

About IDCA
The International Data Center Authority (IDCA) has been established to streamline, structure, educate and give direction to the “data” center industry. IDCA’s core mission is to aid in standardizing the approach, selection, design, feasibility, operation, and various processes and methodologies of the Application Ecosystem®. Formed by data center industry veterans who realized the problems facing the industry and decided to do something about it, IDCA has perceptively identified the gaps and shortcoming of the rapidly evolving data center industry. Hence, while it brings together the best-of-breed practices and principles currently existing within the industry, it caters to the data center stakeholder the proper outlook of it on a broader-scale as well as in-depth details of the data center purpose, discipline, and organization

Streaming Games to the Edge without Dedicated Hardware

Streaming Games to the Edge without Dedicated Hardware

Welcome to our new blog series: Edge Cloud Thought Leadership. This collection of blogs will focus on new technologies and industry leaders in the edge computing market as way to educate a broad IT audience in the future capabilities at the edge.

Company: Blacknut

Blacknut aims to fundamentally change the video game industry by creating a service where users can access a vast catalog of curated games, play without limit across all devices, and no longer have the need for dedicated hardware, all for a simple subscription.

Using the latest cloud computing technology, Blacknut digitizes video games, delivering them through the cloud directly to smart devices such as televisions, tablets, and phones or through devices like set-top boxes and dongles.

Blacknut CEO Olivier Avaro talks about their use of edge computing to enhance their game streaming offering. The video is in French; press CC for English captions

Podcast Highlights:

  • Working at a Gaming Company
  • Game Streaming and Experience
  • Elimination of H/W Limitations for Modern Games
  • Delivery of Game from Cloud vs Edge
  • More than 50% of 5G traffic expected to be Gaming
  • Edge/Cloud Infrastructure Requirements
  • Virtualized Game Platform
  • Challenges in Building the Blacknut Platform

To see more thought leadership videos from the Global Edge Forum event visit our YouTube playlist: Global Edge Forum 2019.

Previous Blogs in this Series:

·         Building Applications for the Edge with a Datacentric Model (3/12/19)

·         Multi-Cloud Management at the Edge (3/19/19)

·         Deploying Containerized Apps at the Edge (or anywhere) (3/26/19)

·         Edge Cloud – Powering Digital Transformation (4/2/19)

·         Global Reach at Massive Scale for Game Studios and esports Competitions (5/15/19)

 

Global Reach at Massive Scale for Game Studios and esport Competitions

Global Reach at Massive Scale for Game Studios and esport Competitions

Welcome to our blog series: Edge Computing Thought Leadership. This collection of blogs will focus on new technologies and industry leaders in the edge computing market as way to educate a broad IT audience in the future capabilities at the edge.

Company: Gameye

Gameye enables game studios to develop sessions and dedicated server based multiplayer games without the hassle of creating, testing and maintaining a global server infrastructure.

Gameye CEO Sebastiaan Heijne delivers a massively scalable gaming platform for esports providers to meet the networking and performance demands of their participants. Gameye meets this requirement by placing the game servers as close to the participant as possible via edge clouds.

Previous Blogs in this Series:

The Economics of Supply, Demand, and the Monetization of the “Edge”

The Economics of Supply, Demand, and the Monetization of the “Edge”

-5 minute read

In 1776, a Scottish author called Adam Smith published “The Wealth of Nations”, but unfortunately for the British, Smith’s book was released in the same year as the American Revolutionary War began in earnest. If it had been published ten years earlier, Parliament and King George III may have taken to heart Smith’s sentiment that “colonies should be granted representation in the British parliament proportional to their contributions to public revenues”. Had this advice been heeded, there may have been no 1776 and arguably, the America Colonies would now be ruling England. Adam Smith would not simply be a great economist and philosopher, but the founding father of the United States of North America and Great Britain.

Supply, Demand, and the Edge

As part of his thesis written some two hundred and fifty years ago, Smith hypothesized – “Price is regulated by the proportion between the quantity brought to market and the demand of those who are willing to pay.”  This simple statement is as profound today as when it was published and has provided the stimulus for numerous economic movements. Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan, who arguably created perhaps the two strongest economies of the 20th century, were reputed to always carry a copy of Smiths work with them.

But what, if anything, does this have to do with edge cloud and cloud computing?The Economics of Supply, Demand, and the Monetization of the “Edge”

For cloud computing, Smith’s principle is enduring.  If we portrayed a graph with price on the y axis and quantity on the x axis and were to plot where the downward slope of demand (Cloud Market) intersects with the upward slope of supply (Compute Inventory), this point in a free market where all available cloud compute resources could be monetized.

The challenge for public cloud providers is that Smith’s principle assumes that the supply at a given price is limited and the cost of an additional unit of inventory becomes higher as the total supply expands. In most industries this is true. A good example is the auto sector. To deliver more quantity, additional workers are required and that comes at a premium as auto makers have presumably exhausted all the workers willing to function at a lower cost.

In public cloud environments, these economics of industrial production do not apply, or at least not cleanly. The cost to add capacity is somewhat negligible as compute costs become insignificant, and storage and bandwidth costs plummet.  Spinning up shared virtualized resources costs is proving to be quite cost effective compared to traditional IT. It is anticipated that 83% of enterprise workloads will run in public clouds by 2020 and thus it could be argued that public compute inventory is effectively infinite if the price exceeds the cost per unit.

This is a challenge for the public cloud companies is an increase in demand for compute has not increased the price. In fact, over the past 10 years price has generally dropped or, at a minimum, has remained constant at any level of demand. The illustration above outlines the decrease in cost per hour pricing for Linux on-demand cloud services offered by a large public cloud provider[1], while the cost of some services dropped as much as 14% in the year up to August 2018[2]. However, the increased demand observed over this period did not create a supply imbalance, and has thus resulted in a highly commoditized market place.

The Commoditization Conundrum

The Economics of Supply, Demand, and the Monetization of the “Edge”This commoditization has generally been seen as a challenge by many network operators considering edge compute as a way to monetizing their investment in their fixed and 5G access networks. Its left them struggling with a business model that, at first glance, doesn’t appear to make a lot of sense. In many cases the approach has simply been for an operator to turn over their edge to a third party while they continue to pay for power, cooling and real-estate based on the hope that they may profit from transit or metro network savings.

However, the economics of public cloud and edge cloud and compute models are very different and there is a good reason for this. The edge offers a fixed, finite inventory of compute resources. This is unique for edge compute and is the result of creating ultra-small and ultra-close access nodes that are distributed in nature with considerable geographical diversity and relatively small available power and real-estate footprints. This means that the supply of edge compute resources at a given access point remains of capacity exists. This has resulted in pricing that is steadily climbing, even as the number of edge compute applications remains relatively low compared to broad spectrum of enterprise applications – a further indication of the effect that a constrained inventory supply has on value.

Clearly every application does not require edge compute. Public cloud & traditional COLO are still a viable locations to host enterprise applications, while there will always be requirements for specific real-time functionality to reside on the “device” itself – autonomous vehicles are a great example. However, for low latency, interactively-intense applications the edge is a hard requirement and as such will command premium pricing. This scarcity of edge compute inventory limits surplus stock and establishes a constrained supply that can be unquestionably monetized, thus the average cost of edge compute will increase significantly and enable the Network Operators to extract fair value from their investment.

So as Adam Smith declared some 250 years ago, when things are scarce and in demand, people have proven to be prepared to pay more for them and there is more profit in supplying them so network operators can feel justified in investing more capital to produce them. Where there is a glut, things are commoditized and prices and profits are low, producers switch their capital and enterprise elsewhere. Unlike the public cloud, the edge inherently rations inventory and drives pricing up automatically and without the need for central direction.

The new “Machine Economy” is already stimulating the deployment and orchestration of edge dependent applications.  While media and entertainment workloads, high resolution cloud gaming and bandwidth efficient VR video delivery may seem like obvious edge use cases for an operator, there are a gamut of emerging enterprise applications that have the potential to be the “new oil”. Autonomous driving experiences, haptics and tele-operation, vRAN, SD-WAN, IoT and smart-cities all benefit from, and more importantly, help the operator to monetize edge and access infrastructure investment.

What Can Be Done?

So what is the call to action?  We believe there is scarcity and high value associated with the Operator edge network and that, if combined into a global network, will deliver exponential value and revenue. Operators also cannot wait for 100 applications to become popular before deciding whether or not to experiment. Edge is a $5Bn+ business and provides numerous opportunities to start trialing new business and deployment models, thus the time to learn is “now”. It all starts by installing some resources in 1 location. Its low cost, high impact and will help start seeding the edge.

[1] Verified by the Internet Archive
[2] Right Scale: Comparing Cloud VM Types and Prices

Edge Cloud - Powering Digital Transformation

Edge Cloud – Powering Digital Transformation

Welcome to our new blog series: Edge Cloud Thought Leadership. This collection of blogs will focus on new technologies and industry leaders in the edge computing market as way to educate a broad IT audience in the future capabilities at the edge.

Mobile World Congress Session – Edge IT: Powering Digital Transformation

Abstract
In a digital age, your business possibilities have no limits and neither should your IT. Your customers, employees and partners are dispersed over more geographic locations, consuming more data, using a multitude of devices and expecting more than ever. Various forces and opportunities are driving this change at the Internet and Telco edge, requiring you to re-architect your infrastructure to answer to this call. To succeed, you need to build your digital infrastructure where it can scale to match your opportunities, and where you tap into ecosystems that will drive and deliver value. Equinix is expanding our global platform for digital business physically and virtually around the world and working with ecosystem partners to enable you to reach everywhere, interconnect everyone and integrate everything. Build and partner here, and you can go anywhere. Please join us for our panel discussion with Ericsson’s Edge Gravity and Haste for an open dialogue about:

  • Disruption at the Edge
  • Forces driving change
  • Ecosystem collaboration for success

The event session is broken down into several videos for faster consumption of information based on interest.

Jim Poole, Equinix

Jim tells the history of Equinix at Ashburn, VA to build a new data center for a proper ecosystem with content providers and ISPs. From there he talks about financial networks and the algorithmic trading services bringing them to a single data center. Equinix currently has 200+ data centers around the world with 300,000+ interconnects.

Alan Evans, EDGE GRAVITY

Alan presents EDGE GRAVITY’s perspective on edge cloud and where the future of edge is between existing public clouds and the end users at the service provider edge. This new infrastructure layer will deliver exceptionally low latency applications for customer consumption in ways we have not yet begun to understand.

Paul Dawes, Mode

Paul discusses Mode’s focus on the enterprise wide area network market using EDGE GRAVITY and Equinix infrastructure. They provide a software defined core that SD-WAN does for the edge of the network.

Panel Discussion

Jim sits with Alan and Paul to discuss various topics in edge cloud, telecommunications, and infrastructure for next generation services.

To see more thought leadership videos from the Global Edge Forum event visit our YouTube playlist: Global Edge Forum 2019.

Previous Blogs in this Series:

Deploying Containerized Apps at the Edge (or Anywhere)

Deploying Containerized Apps at the Edge (or Anywhere)

Welcome to our new blog series: Edge Cloud Thought Leadership. This collection of blogs will focus on new technologies and industry leaders in the edge computing market as way to educate a broad IT audience in the future capabilities at the edge.

Company: Rafay Systems

Rafay enables developers to automate the distribution, operations, cross-region scaling and lifecycle management of containerized microservices across public and private clouds, and service provider networks.

Rafay CEO and Co-Founder Haseeb Budhani on the fundamental shift in computing based based on the emergence of personalized applications requiring substantially lower latency than is expected in current infrastructure models. A new edge cloud industry is emerging to meet new service requirements including low latency.

Podcast highlights:
• Building an application deployment platform as close to the Edge as possible
• Supporting containers, microservices (move latency sensitive parts of app to Edge) and availability of infrastructure
• Definition of Edge
• Issues of massive amount of data at the Edge to be handled – Use Cases
• Will Edge suffer from device specific infrastructure needs?
• Application bottlenecks and impact of cloud locations and end user
• Placement control of services is still an open issue based on user requirements
• IT infrastructure and ownership and performance issues (IT vs Operation Teams)
• Cloud and Edge are not competitive; they work together to offer applications best fit

To see more thought leadership videos from the Global Edge Forum event visit our YouTube playlist: Global Edge Forum 2019.

Previous Blogs in this Series:

Multi-Cloud Data Management at the Edge

Multi-Cloud Data Management at the Edge

Welcome to our new blog series: Edge Cloud Thought Leadership. This collection of blogs will focus on new technologies and industry leaders in the edge computing market as way to educate a broad IT audience in the future capabilities at the edge.

Company: Kmesh.

Kmesh delivers a simple SaaS solution that lets you orchestrate all your application data from a single global namespace – regardless of its physical, logical or legal location. We provide line-of-business professionals and service providers with the best way to deploy apps and support them with data, anywhere.

Kmesh CEO Jeff Kim talks how we are progressing from public to hybrid cloud in terms of the same process occurring for edge. He also comments on how we need to create distributed data ponds as services move to the edge; we can no longer develop on the old centralized data model.

Jeff Kim discusses in depth the challenges of stateful data at the edge and how Kmesh is architecting a new platform to meet these data issues for the edge: both edge-to-cloud and edge-to-edge.

To see more thought leadership videos from the Global Edge Forum event visit our YouTube playlist: Global Edge Forum 2019.

Previous Blogs in this Series:

Building Applications for the Edge with a Datacentric Model

Building Applications for the Edge with a Datacentric Model

Welcome to our new blog series: Edge Computing Thought Leadership. This collection of blogs will focus on new technologies and industry leaders in the edge computing market as way to educate a broad IT audience in the future capabilities at the edge.

Company: Macrometa

Macrometa Global Edge Fabric is an Edge Native Platform as a Service (PaaS) for building distributed applications and APIs for the web, mobile devices, IoT, gaming and more. It delivers instant, low latency stateful data for Single Page Apps (SPAs), Progressive Web Apps (PWAs), and more.

Chetan Venkatesh, CEO at Macrometa on how edge will generate an entire new class of services based on proximity to customers, location awareness, and the ability to co-ordinate data and services that don’t work in a centralized cloud. The edge requires a paradigm shift from the current architecture of databases as edge demands the processing of massive amounts of data in real-time to present the customer with instant responses.

Challenges of edge computing for application developers:

  • Complexity of large-scale distributed systems
  • Real-time data analysis at significant volume
  • Leverage existing languages

To see more thought leadership videos from the Global Edge Forum event visit our YouTube playlist: Global Edge Forum 2019.

Edge Computing – The Uber of Cloud Pricing

Edge Computing – The Uber of Cloud Pricing

A question I get asked, with increasing frequency is “how much will it cost to compute at the edge?”. The answer is not that straight forward, and with a typical engineering perspective I often reply with “it depends”. “It depends”, because the edge is not simply a smaller version of the public cloud or central cloud where the resources of the public cloud are for all intents and purposes considered infinite. Of course, they are not infinite, but an application developer doesn’t really concern themselves with the finite limitations of public cloud resources, they state their base level requirements on the infrastructure, and how far they are prepared to scale-up based on the on-demand requirements of their application.

Is the Edge Just a Smaller Version of the Public Cloud?

So why is the edge not simply a smaller version of the public cloud?, Well I tend to see edge resources as not being infinite, I think of them as a premium resource, and when we consider the service provider edge, those resources are highly distributed and typically hierarchical in nature depending on the network topology.

Edge Computing – The Uber of Cloud PricingWe might consider, that as compute environments are placed at various points between (and including) public centralised clouds, and the deep edge of service provider networks, the developer community, and application providers will make decisions about where specifically they need portions of their solution to be executed to reap the most benefit.

I’m not suggesting that they (application developers) will suddenly place all workloads at the edge, that doesn’t seem like a good use in my mind; having huge big-data analytics processes running at the deep edge wouldn’t provide any tangible benefit. However, if an application requires a low latency transaction, some element of security, or even sovereignty, locality or personalisation, network integration, or an increase in “performance” then placing those workloads at the edge will make a lot of “engineering” sense. But how do we consider the cost to compute at the edge if it is indeed a premium resource or location?

Imagine cloud computing is the hotel industry. The public or centralised clouds always have room, you can book yourself in and out, and if your requirements change you can be accommodated without issue, if you decide to have more guests stay, that’s no problem, if you decide to throw a party, don’t worry about it, stay as long as you want, you will just be billed at the end of the month. The edge might be thought of as a little more boutique in nature, sure they have many desirable locations, but the rooms are more limited in supply and they typically cater for more specific requirements and shorter stays, and at busy periods may cost slightly more to attract only those guests that truly require that level of service on offer.

Edge Computing – The Uber of Cloud PricingOk, sorry about the hotel analogy. But my point is that I can imagine a scenario where the cost to compute at the edge is dynamic in nature, any workloads placed at the edge will carry a weighting based on their target performance requirements (latency, security, sovereignty, locality, personalisation, network integration and so on) and those workloads will be dynamically distributed across the hierarchy of edge compute nodes. To aid in this “multiplexing” of workloads, the deeper edge will favour less persistent software functions and processes, leaving those that require a more prolonged existence to more central locations.

But what about the cost to compute? I see the cost of compute becoming a little bit like the Uber surge pricing, yes I am aware I jumped from hotel to taxi analogies, but please bear with me. One way to balance the need to execute workloads at the edge with performance weightings will be surge type pricing. If an application truly needs to have functions executed somewhere across edge points of presence, then the cost-to-compute will play a large factor in how load balancing multiple independent application functions at across those locations will work and be costed.

For more information on edge computing and the challenges or infrastructure decisions reach out to the EDGE GRAVITY team at info@edgegravity.com.

Meet, Greet, and Share with EDGE GRAVITY in Barcelona during Mobile World Congress

Meet, Greet, and Share with EDGE GRAVITY in Barcelona during Mobile World Congress

Meet, Greet, and Share with EDGE GRAVITY in Barcelona during Mobile World Congress

Later this month, a sizable number of technology and business leaders are gathering in Barcelona to demonstrate the coming revolution in 5G, IoT and other solutions being built on the edge. EDGE GRAVITY is looking forward to meeting with customers, service providers, and technologists in sharing our vision for edge computing. If you are interested in meeting with us, please contact me via email to setup a time and location.

We are attending Mobile World Congress as part of the Ericsson booth with demonstrations of our Edge Cloud Platform running technologies from the gaming industry, SD-CORE, and shared CDN amongst other solutions. The Ericsson booth is located in Hall 2 Stand 2060. Stop by to spend some time with our team to see our edge technology in action across a variety of verticals.

 

4YFN19

Meet, Greet, and Share with EDGE GRAVITY in Barcelona during Mobile World Congress

As a newly launched company we are also participating in the 4YFN19 event which is located at Fira Montjuïc, near the site of MWC. 4 Years From Now [4YFN] is the startup business platform that enables startups, investors and companies to connect and launch new business ventures together.

Session Title: Lag Kills The Thrill.  How Gaming Acceleration At The Edge Is The Antidote

Session Day and Time: Tuesday, February 26 at 13:45

Speakers: Yves Boudreau (CMO and VP Business Development, EDGE GRAVITY) and Adam Toll (Founder of Haste).

 

Equinix Power Hour

Meet, Greet, and Share with EDGE GRAVITY in Barcelona during Mobile World Congress

We are also speaking at the Equinix Power Hour during Mobile World Congress (Session Info). Registration is required to attend this 45 minute session with 45 minutes of drinks.

Session Title: Edge IT: Powering Digital Transformation

Session Day and Time:  Wednesday, 27 Feb at 16:30 – 18:00

Location: Hall 8.0, Theater D

Speakers: Yves Boudreau (CMO and VP Business Development, EDGE GRAVITY), Jim Poole (VP Business Development, Equinix), Lynn Haste (CEO, Haste), and Adam Toll (Co-Founder, Haste).

 

Global Edge Forum

Meet, Greet, and Share with EDGE GRAVITY in Barcelona during Mobile World Congress

Finally, over the past few years Ericsson has been hosting a one-day pre-MWC event bringing together global leaders in the service provider, content provider, and application provider space to look ahead at the future our industry. The Global Edge Forum is being held again this year with an emphasis on Edge, 5G and in-market services that customers are taking advantage of today.

 

 

Social Media

We will actively promote a variety of activities on social media as well as create a series of videos from Ericsson and EDGE GRAVITY employees as well as partners and customers. Be sure to follow our three main social media platforms: Twitter (@EdgeGravity), LinkedIn (EDGE GRAVITY Company Page), and YouTube (EDGE GRAVITY Home Page)

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Real Edge Computing